T3 Rpi WiFi Router Setup TP Link TL-WR902AC

We recommend purchasing this router pre-programmed to provide the rpi wireless network, but it must still be connected to your local school WiFi.

This router allows you to connect to any type of wireless network and re-broadcast it as a local private WiFi network – also one LAN port can be connected to a local networking device such as a Raspberry Shake.

This allows the RPi computers to talk to each other over the LAN and do other local area networking tasks.

Configuration Guide for Pre Programmed Router:

RPi Airquality Station: Logging Airquality-Data to Grafana

Goal:

Log data to an online grafana database, and then view the resulting graphs and maps.

What you will learn:

  • Configuring easybotics air-quality sensors,
  • setting up the grafana logging node
  • viewing the logged data.

 

What you need to know:

Parts List:

  • Full easybotics air-quality station kit
  • Raspberry pi
  • Internet Connection

 

 

Setting up node-red:

Start Node-Red and navigate to 127.0.0.1:1880  using the web browser. Drag in all the air-quality nodes, and the BME node from the palette.
Select the C02 node, from the drop down menu select ‘Add new sensor manager’; the only configuration here is to switch the ‘Automatic C02 calibration’ to ‘Manual’.

By default the C02 Sensor will zero itself to the lowest C02 level it detects in a 24 hour period, pinning that value to 400ppm which is the atmospheric baseline. If your air-quality station is indoors, or in a crowded place this might lead to inaccurate data so you can change it here to manual.

Next select the PM concentration node, and Particulate node and select the Sensor Manager you made from the dropdown.

With this the config is far enough too start printing data to the led-matrix (if you have one); with the setup looking like this.

 

For the next steps you’ll need the influxdb username and password that should have been provided to you.
Select the ‘Publish to Influxdb’ node and enter your username and password here.
For the GeoHash field you’ll need to use a tool like this one: http://geohash.gofreerange.com Drag the map around, and click to generate different scale geohashes. Remember that the more digits you use the more specific of a location you’ll be providing to the T3 database.

Now you can link all the sensor nodes into the publish node like so:
The URL status below the node is where you can find your logged data, sadly you can’t copy and paste out of the status bar thing.  The node pushes the url out as a message, so using a debug node you can retrieve the URL and view your graphs.

 

RPi Minecraft + Networking

In this activity students will learn about networking on the Raspberry Pi using a popular pre installed game called Minecraft.

I use this opportunity to speak about the human networking that happens when a team of individuals work together. Minecraft is known as a sandbox game where blocks can be created or destroyed.   Many students have played Minecraft in a way that players attack each other known as player vs player, or PVP. Establish that this is not the kind of environment that is being created.  Students will work together to build something cool.

Establishing a level of experience with Minecraft is a good way to start.  I like to group advanced users with each other and beginning users together.  Each group needs to brainstorm, plan and build something in a specified amount of time.  I usually give students between 15 and 30 minutes and encourage them to stretch to collaborate.   Groups can range in size from 2 – 5 players.  One student will “host” the world on their device and will need to identify their I.P address to share with partner players.

Immediately upon opening up Minecraft students given an option to join game or create a new world.  If they create a world, it exists on their pi, if they join a world they need to know who’s world they are joining.  This becomes a process of students calling out and identifying who’s pi is at which IP address.  The IP address can be found by hovering over the Wifi signal in the upper right corner of the screen.

Students who have never used Minecraft will need assistance learning to move within the world, to place a block and to change their inventory.  These students should focus on building something very simple.  Advanced students might build a castle or a huge underground maze.  At the end of the build time, join into the world on your Pi and let one of the students from each group share what they created.

If students wish to save the world they are working on, they will need to navigate to the .minecraft folder from and drill down to the folder of the world they were playing in.  The following video goes over how to do this.